July162014

Train Depot- Minburn, IA

A preface: I had hesitated to upload these photos, back when I initially took them, due to the poor quality of the camera I was using. So ignore the lensflare, the washed out colors and the uneven framing :)

This 100 year old depot sits in the middle of the towering grain elevators near the middle of the tiny town of Minburn. What was once used as a rest stop and station for the multitude of trains that used to criss-cross this area of central Iowa, will now be given new life this Thursday as a trail head, cafe, and rest area for a nearby bike trail. 

KCCI is covering the moving process as the depot finds its new home just a block away.

Find out more here:

http://www.kcci.com/news/towns-100-year-old-train-depot-is-moving/26985316

July122014
June92014

axstinphoto said: Why don't you ever go in

Usually im by myself so I dont want to possibly get trapped or hurt. 

5PM
Washington Elementary- Des Moines, IA

In 1874, Washington Elementary opened its doors to students of the original Des Moines school district. Located just off of Indianola road and SE 14th on East Hartford, this distinctive brick structure stands as a reminder of school days past.

Initially home to kindergarten through sixth grade students, the school was expanded many times over the course of its life to accommodate older classes. Following its closure as a school, the building was given new life as a day care center for some years. 

More info and history can be found here:
http://www.dmschools.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/dmpshistory.pdf

— inDes Moines, IA.

June12014

First Church of Christ, Scientist- Des Moines, IA

Psalms says, “The Lord is near to the brokenhearted and saves the crushed in spirit.”


On the corner of Grand and 38th street stands The First Church of Christ Scientist. Completed in 1932, this romantic temple was once referred to by the Des Moines Register as, “…one of the Midwest’s most handsome churches.” 

This stone beauty with its iron steeple pierce the canopies of the surrounding oak and hickory trees firmly established on the church grounds. Almost entirely intact, the only signs of abandonment are the numerous “No Trespassing” signs, small holes in the faded stained-glass windows, the deteriorating front steps and the overgrown lawn. 

Its a shame what the future holds for the church- the property was bought out by WesleyLife; a condominum and retirement home company that plans to demolish the church and build a condo unit on the grounds. Shame. 

Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair.

May142014

itiscalledthetardis said: I think you should try this one abandoned hotel in Johnston that I heard about. I looked it up on google maps and it seems to be located exactly where I was told it was- right behind the quicktrip in johnston off of I-80. I can't find proof of this, but I was told the story behind it is that the manager of the hotel went insane and killed six of his employees. It'd be really neat to check out, I think.

I’ve been scoping it out for a while too! Its on my to-do list!

8PM

iowaarchaeology said: Hi! I just watched the youtube video featured on your Tumblr. My computer speakers weren't working, so I turned the closed captioning on. Does YouTube or the Daily Iowan generate the closed captioning? There is a very embarrassing and politically incorrect word at 35 seconds. It definitely needs to be fixed! If it's the Daily Iowan, I'll write to them myself. Just wanted to give you a heads up! --Elizabeth at the OSA

Oh jeesh! I’m fairly certain Youtube does the CC on videos. The spot was just shot with a journalist from the  U of I and I’m 100% certain there wasnt any sort of language in the final product.
April302014
April282014

Well, I’m going to out myself here, but this is a great news vignette that was shot by a University of Iowa journalist for the Daily Iowan out of Iowa City! Check it out!

April202014
Button Factory- Washington, IA

In the early 20th century, clothing buttons were primarily made from the pearl insides of clams and oysters from the beds of the Mississippi River and many other tributaries or bodies of water. This particular factory was a facility that did just that. Clams and oysters were shipped into the small town of Washington to be turned into accessories and fasteners. 

Closed since 1965 due to the massive increase and ease of access that came from making plastic buttons instead of pearl, the facility stands strong in a state of active decomposition. Instead of seeing glistening pearl dust on the ground, broken class and various pieces of rusted metal litter the grounds of the former largest employer in the area. 

Also, special thanks to Inma Mateos Aguilar for taking the time to film and interview me as I took pictures!

Sources and more info found here:

http://www.muscatinehistory.org/whos-got-the-button
 


http://www6.semo.edu/universitypress/Knopp_Harvest.htm
 
— inWashington, IA.
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